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What Supplements Help to Lower A1C?

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If you’re trying to manage your diabetes or suspect high glucose levels, you should pay a visit to your primary care provider and request an A1C test. This test displays the patient’s average blood sugar level over a two to three month-span.

Diabetics regularly monitor their blood sugar levels with this test to ensure they’re staying within a target range. For people who don’t have diabetes, this test can help diagnose it. The A1C is not an appropriate test for every patient because various factors affect red blood cell count, so talk with your doctor beforehand.

An A1C test can be used to estimate your average blood sugar level, or eAG. If your levels are higher than normal, then you and your doctor will discuss medication options to help lower your levels. There are also various supplements like Glucotype2 available that also may help lower blood sugar levels.

1. Chromium

Chromium may improve insulin action in your body and lower blood sugar in Type 2 diabetic patients. When you’re deficient in chromium it lowers your body’s ability to use carbs which are converted into sugar for energy. As a result, your insulin levels rise.

A 200 mcg dose is typical, but daily 1,000 mcg doses have been tested on diabetics and appears to be more effective. Take note that some drugs, like antacids and other heartburn medications, can reduce chromium absorption.

2. Vitamin D

People with type 2 diabetes are also commonly vitamin D deficient. In fact, one study found 72 percent of Type 2 diabetic participants were vitamin D deficient at the start of the study. Your physician or a RN-BSN program certified nurse will check your blood levels. Vitamin D supplements may trigger mild to moderate reactions with certain medicines, so talk with your doctor or pharmacist before taking this supplement.

3. Cinnamon

Many studies support that cinnamon may help lower blood sugar by making cells more receptive to insulin. In a three-month study, type 2 diabetics who took 120 or 360 mg of cinnamon extract before breakfast saw an 11 percent to 14 percent decrease in fasting blood sugar levels.

As a precaution, opt for ceylon cinnamon instead of the more readily available Cassia variety. The common Cassia cinnamon has more coumarin, a compound that may damage your liver if consumed in high amounts. The recommended cinnamon extract dose is 250 mg twice a day before meals, and 500 mg twice a day for a regular, non-extracted cinnamon supplement.

4. Probiotics

Taking antibiotics is one way to damage healthy gut bacteria, but diseases such as diabetes, can also play a part. Probiotics, which contain helpful bacteria and other microbes, offer various health benefits and can help improve how your body handles carbs. Animal studies indicate that probiotics can help moderate blood sugar by reducing inflammation and protecting insulin-making pancreatic cells.

5. Alpha-Lipoic Acid

ALA, or alpha-lipoic acid, is a powerful antioxidant produced in the liver and found in some foods like red meat, broccoli, and spinach. ALA may help improve insulin sensitivity and the cells’ absorption of sugar from you blood, although it may take a few months to experience the benefits.

Doses are usually 600 — 1,200 mg daily divided into smaller doses before meals. This vitamin-like compound may interfere with hyperthyroid medications, so seek your doctor’s guidance first. Also, avoid ALA if you struggle with alcoholism or have low thiamine (vitamin B1) levels.

There are even more supplements available that may help lower your A1C levels, but remember results vary per individual. Introduce only one new supplement at a time and remember to consult your doctor before starting a new regimen. Incorporating supplements is just one way you can help manage your diabetes and keep blood sugar levels under control.

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